Lawrence An, MD


SCROLL DOWN

Lawrence An, MD


INTERNAL MEDICINE


lawrence an, md

Associate Professor, Internal Medicine
Director of the Center for Health Communications Research (CHCR)

734-763-6099
lcan@med.umich.edu

Lawrence An is a general internist and Associate Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan where he serves as the Director of the Center for Health Communications Research (CHCR). In this role, Dr. An oversees a multidisciplinary team that has developed over 150 tailored health programs across the continuum of care. Dr. An did his medical training and internal medicine residency at the University of Michigan before completing a fellowship with the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar’s program. For 11 years prior to joining the University of Michigan faculty, Dr. An was on faculty at the University of Minnesota where he worked closely with health plans, health care provider organizations, and the state health department. Dr. An’s research teams have developed and tested several web-based tailored interventions for health behavior change. His research has focused on tobacco cessation and health promotion in the areas of clinical guideline implementation and health systems change, design and evaluation of statewide public health services, and development of innovative web-based and mobile interventions.

Urvashi Bhan, MD


Urvashi Bhan, MD


urvashi bhan, md

Assistant Professor,  Internal Medicine
Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine

734-763-9077
ubhan@umich.edu

Dr. Bhan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine at the University of Michigan. She completed her medical education at Topiwalla National Medical College (TNMC) in  Mumbai, India and went on to do her Internal Medicine residency from University of Hawaii in 2004. She then completed her Pulmonary & Critical Care fellowship at the University of Michigan in 2007. After completing her fellowship she joined the faculty at the University of Michigan to continue her research training and was funded by the NIH/NHLBI T32 Multidisciplinary Training Program in Lung Diseases. 

Dr. Bhan’s research focuses on exploring the innate immune mechanisms involved in host response to pathogen challenges as well as understanding the pathogenesis of lung injury complicating pneumonia. Her Investigation in basic science is principally directed at understanding the role of specific cells, cytokines, and microRNA in the generation of protective innate immune responses of the lung. Specialized areas of clinical interest include sepsis, acute lung injury, community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. Her research is currently funded by KO8 award from the NHLBI.

 

Y. Eugene Chen, MD


Y. Eugene Chen, MD


y. eugene chen, md

Frederick Huetwell Professor, Cardiovascular Medicine
Department of Internal Medicine
 

734-763-7838
echenum@umich.edu

Dr. Eugene Chen is the endowed Frederick Huetwell Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical Center. The long-term goal of Dr. Chen’s research program in vascular medicine is elucidating the molecular basis of obesity/diabetes-induced cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and stroke, and on developing new drugs/technologies to study and treat diabetes and CVD.

In the past years, Dr. Chen’s laboratory has made a series of significant contributions to our understanding of the role of PPAR activation as a determinant of vascular cell gene expression and cellular function and has been among the first to define the role of PPAR activation in the cardiovascular system. The discovery of the high affinity physiological PPAR ligands, nitro-fatty acids advances our understanding of endogenous PPAR modulation and provides novel therapeutic strategies for treating obesity/diabetes and CVD. Dr. Chen was the first one to clone the exendin-4 (BYETTA, the drug name for Exendin-4) gene in 1995.

Recently, Dr. Chen was named as the Director of the Center for Advanced Models for Translational Sciences and Therapeutics (CAMTraST) and the Vice-Chair for Basic and Translational Research in the Department of Cardiac Surgery within University of Michigan Medical Center. CAMTraST researchers are among the first in the world to produce gene knockout and knockin transgenic animals in non-rodent species (e.g. rabbits and pigs) using advanced technologies such as Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN), Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease (TALEN), and Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT). We also have the technology platform for Embryonic Stem Cells (ESC) and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC).

Vineet Chopra, MBBS


Vineet Chopra, MBBS


vineet chopra, mbbs

Assistant Professor, Internal Medicine
Research Scientist, Patient Safety Enhancement Program
Research Scientist, Center for Clinical Management Research, Ann Arbor VA Medical Center 

734-232-6801
vineetc@umich.edu

Dr. Chopra is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Research Scientist for the Patient Safety Enhancement Program and the Center for Clinical Management Research at Ann Arbor’s VA Medical Center and the University of Michigan Health System. A health-services trained researcher, Dr. Chopra’s research interest focuses on improving the safety of hospitalized patients and prevention of hospital-acquired complications. He is particularly interested in preventing complications related to vascular devices, including central venous catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters. Dr. Chopra’s research has been published in leading journals including JAMA, BMJ and the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Colin R. Cooke, MD, MSc, MS


Colin R. Cooke, MD, MSc, MS


colin r. cooke, md, msc, ms

Assistant Professor, Medicine, Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine
Faculty, Center for Healthcare Outcomes & Policy

734-615-9861
cookecr@umich.edu

Dr. Cooke is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine at the University of Michigan. He is also a faculty member of the Center for Healthcare Outcomes & Policy, a multidisciplinary center that aims to improve the efficiency of healthcare in the United States, by optimizing clinical practice and informing health policy. He received his undergraduate engineering degree from the University of Michigan in 1996, an M.D. from Ohio State University in 2000, and completed his Internal Medicine residency and Pulmonary & Critical Care fellowship at the University of Washington in 2007. During his fellowship he earned a Masters of Epidemiology from the University of Washington’s School of Public Health.  He returned to the University of Michigan in 2009 as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar where he earned a Masters of Health and Healthcare Research prior to his current appointment.

Dr. Cooke’s research focuses on how healthcare policy, the healthcare system, and individual patient characteristics interact to shape the quality and efficiency of ICU care delivery. This includes: (1) characterizing the drivers of variation in the use, quality, and costs of critical care services, with a specific focus on practice variation and regional and organizational contributors, and (2) understanding and removing racial, socioeconomic, and health insurance based disparities in critical care.  Fundamentally, much of Dr. Cooke’s research is based upon the premise that critical care, when delivered to inappropriate patients, may cause harm and increases healthcare spending without appreciable benefit. Through this work, Dr. Cooke’s collaborates closely with faculty in the Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Biostatistics, Health Management & Policy, and Economics.  Methodologically, this work employs analysis of both clinical and large-scale administrative databases, outcome prediction, multi-level and Bayesian modeling, cost-effectiveness simulation, and causal analysis.  He also utilizes novel data visualization techniques to characterize patterns of critical illness at the national level. His work is currently supported by a K08 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

Anthony J. Courey, MD


Anthony J. Courey, MD


anthony j. courey, md

Assistant Professor,  Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

734-763-9077
 acourey@umich.edu

Dr. Anthony J. Courey is an Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.  Dr. Courey is a graduate of the University of California at Davis and received his medical degree from the Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C.  Dr. Courey completed his residency in Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern/Parkland Memorial Hospital and fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Michigan.  He is Associate Director of the Critical Care Medicine Unit at the University of Michigan Hospital.  Dr. Courey’s research interests are in the area of critical care medicine, including ARDS, ICU point of care ultrasound, and critical care education.  He has been an ultrasonography/echocardiography instructor nationally for the ACCP and regionally at the University of Michigan in a joint venture with Henry Ford Hospital.  He has served as a co-investigator in a number of critical care multicenter trials in ARDS mechanical ventilation and sepsis. He has a particular interest in the use of esophageal pressure catheters to guide PEEP in ARDS management.  Dr. Courey’s major research interest include ICU Point of Care Ultrasound, Mechanical Ventilation in ARDS and ICU Education.

Dr. Courey has been active in education while at the University of Michigan. In addition to his role as Associate Director of the Critical Care Medicine Unit, he has directed the ICU Ultrasound Course and co-directs the M2 Medical Student Pulmonary Series. He also teaches airway skills and ultrasound-guided central line placement. He has been honored with several teaching awards during his brief time on the Internal Medicine faculty. He has twice been awarded the Pulmonary/Critical Care Fellowship Outstanding Educator of the Year award. In addition, he has received the H. Marvin Pollard Award for Outstanding Teaching of Residents and most recently the Richard D. Judge Award for Excellence in Medical Student Education. He has been a reviewer for the Respiratory Care Journal. In addition, Dr. Courey is an author for the web based medical resource "UpToDate."

 

Scott Denstaedt, MD


Scott Denstaedt, MD


Scott Denstaedt, md

scott_denstaedt.png

Fellow, Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine, Internal Medicine

734-936-7576

sdenstae@med.umich.edu

Dr. Scott J. Denstaedt is a Fellow in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan. He received his undergraduate degree in biology at the University of Michigan in 2005. Dr. Denstaedt completed his medical training at Wayne State University in 2011. He subsequently completed residency and chief residency in Internal Medicine at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in 2016. He is currently a third year fellow in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine.

Dr. Denstaedt currently works with Dr. Benjamin H. Singer in Dr. Theodore J. Standiford's lab in basic and translation studies of long-term brain dysfunction after sepsis. He is interested in persistent immune phenotypes after sepsis and how these affect patient outcomes. Dr. Denstaedt plans to pursue further research training through the University of Michigan NIH/NHLBI T32 Multidisciplinary Training Program in Lung Diseases.

Robert P. Dickson, MD


Robert P. Dickson, MD


robert p. dickson, md

Assistant Professor, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

734-936-5549
rodickso@med.umich.edu

Dr. Dickson is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine in the Department of Medicine at the University of Michigan. He received his undergraduate degree from St. John's College in 2000, an M.D. from Duke University in 2007, and completed his Internal Medicine residency at the University of Washington in 2011, after which he served as Chief Medical Resident at Harborview Medical Center from 2011-2012. He completed his fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Michigan and has been a member of the faculty since 2014.

Dr. Dickson's research focuses on understanding the mechanisms by which microbial communities in the respiratory tract mediate respiratory illness and health. Utilizing culture-independent techniques of microbial identification, he studies how changes in the lung microbiome interact with host factors, clinical interventions and patient outcomes in order to generate novel mechanistic hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis of respiratory infections and inflammatory lung disease. His laboratory performs integrative translational research, spanning from molecular characterization of respiratory microbiota to animal modeling of acute lung disease to prospective trials of human subjects. Areas of clinical interest include the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), lung transplantation and the healthy respiratory tract. His work is supported by the NIH/NHLBI T32 Multidisciplinary Training Program in Lung Diseases, the Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR) and by the University of Michigan's Host Microbiome Initiative.

Scott A. Flanders, MD


Scott A. Flanders, MD


scott a. flanders, md

Professor, General Internal Medicine
Associate Division Chief of General Medicine for Inpatient Programs
Associate Director of Inpatient Programs, Internal Medicine                                     

734-936-2059
flanders@med.umich.edu

Scott A. Flanders, M.D. is currently Professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan, where he serves as Associate Division Chief of General Medicine for Inpatient Programs and Associate Director of Inpatient Programs for the Department of Internal Medicine.  He is the Director of the University of Michigan’s Hospitalist Program, which has grown to include over 75 faculty members and staff.

Dr. Flanders was a founding member of the Board of Directors of the Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) and is a Past-President of SHM.  He was Editor of the society’s publication, The Hospitalist from 1997 through 2003He also served as the Associate Editor of AHRQ’s Web M&M online journal of patient safety from its inception until 2004, and was Deputy Editor for the Journal of Hospital Medicine, from 2005-2008.

In addition to these activities, Dr. Flanders has been active in quality improvement and patient safety at the University of Michigan.  His research interests include hospitalists, hospital-acquired conditions and their prevention, dissemination of patient safety and quality improvement practices, and the diagnosis and treatment of lower respiratory infections.  He has served as a Principal Investigator (PI) of a grant from the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation to support the creation of a multi-hospital consortium (the HELPS Consortium) to disseminate and implement best practices in patient safety and is also the PI of U of M’s innovative Specialist Hospitalist Allied Research Program (SHARP).

Dr. Flanders has helped develop and lead two statewide, hospitalist-focused quality collaboratives; the Hospital Medicine Safety (HMS) consortium, focused on preventing adverse events in hospitalized patients, and the Michigan Transition of Care Collaborative (MTC-2) which strives to improve the hospital discharge process.  He has authored over 60 articles in peer reviewed journals and book chapters and has edited two textbooks and a book series in the field of Hospital Medicine.  He speaks regularly at national conferences on hospitalists, hospital-acquired conditions, quality improvement, patient safety, and community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. 

Hamid Ghanbari, MD, MPH


Hamid Ghanbari, MD, MPH


hamid ghanbari, md, mph

Clinical Lecturer in Internal Medicine
Department of Internal Medicine Cardiology

734-763-7141
ghhamid@umich.edu

 Dr. Ghanbari received his Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry from McMaster University. He received his Medical Degree from the American University of the Caribbean. He completed his residency and Cardiology fellowship at Providence Hospital. He completed a Masters in Public Health during his Cardiology fellowship from Wayne State University. After completing his fellowship in Cardiac Electrophysiology at University of Michigan he was recruited as faculty in the Division of Cardiology.   Dr. Ghanbari's research interests include atrial fibrillation ablation and using advanced signal processing and machine-learning algorithms to predict outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation. He has published in several prominent medical journals including Archives of Internal Medicine, Heart Rhythm, Journal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology, Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology and American Journal of Cardiology. 

Hitinder S. Gurm, MD


Hitinder S. Gurm, MD


hitinder s. gurm, md

Professor, Internal Medicine
Chief, Section of Cardiology, VA  Ann Arbor Healthcare System
Associate Chief, Cardiovascular Medicine

734-232-4276
hgurm@umich.edu

Hitinder S. Gurm, MD is an Associate Professor of Internal Medicine and is the Chief, Section of Cardiology, VA Ann Arbor Health Care System and the Associate Chief, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan Health System. He is also Director of the Blue Cross Blue Shield Cardiovascular Consortium Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Registry (BMC2-PCI). BMC2-PCI is a multi-center, quality improvement registry funded by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, designed to improve quality of care and outcomes for patients who undergo percutaneous coronary interventions in the state of Michigan.

Dr. Gurm obtained his cardiology training at the Cleveland Clinic and joined the University of Michigan in 2005 as an interventional cardiologist where he runs a busy clinical practice and oversees a large research network. His research interests include orphan drug development, contrast induced nephropathy, clinical quality improvement and development of novel devices for endovascular interventions. He has published more than 180 original articles and book chapters and has been named as an inventor on four patents. He is the founder of Niche therapeutics, and works closely with many start-ups in development and commercialization of novel medical products.

Michael Heung, MD, MS


Michael Heung, MD, MS


michael heung, md, ms

Associate Professor, Internal Medicine

734-936-4890
mheung@umich.edu

Dr. Michael Heung is an Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Dr. Heung received his medical degree from the Boston University School of Medicine and completed an internal medicine residency and chief residency at the University of Cincinnati Hospitals. Upon completing his fellowship in nephrology at the University of Michigan, he joined the faculty and has served as the Medical Director for the Acute Dialysis Program since 2006.

Dr. Heung’s research focuses on the area of acute kidney injury (AKI) and critical care nephrology. His particular areas of interest include optimizing safety of continuous renal replacement therapy, determining predictors of renal recovery following AKI, exploring novel approaches to detecting fluid overload, and pharmacokinetics in critically ill patients with AKI. Additionally, as an investigator at the University of Michigan Kidney Epidemiology and Cost Center (UM-KECC), he examines AKI measures and outcomes on multiple federally-funded projects including the United States Renal Data System (USRDS), the Veterans Affairs Kidney Disease Registry, and the CDC Chronic Kidney Disease Surveillance System.

H. David Humes, MD


H. David Humes, MD


h. david humes, md

Professor, Division of Nephrology, Internal Medicine

734-763-5120
 dhumes@umich.edu

Dr. Humes is a Professor in the Division of Nephrology of the Department of Internal Medicine. He has served in the past as Chief of Medicine at the VA Medical Center in Ann Arbor and Chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine of the University of Michigan. He graduated from the University of California, San Francisco. He completed post graduate training at UCSF, University of Pennsylvania, and Harvard. He served as a Harvard faculty member prior to joining the faculty at University of Michigan.

Dr. Humes’ research interest has spanned areas of stem cells, cell therapy, biomaterials, device fabrication, biomimetic membranes, nanofabrication and tissue engineering. He has published over 200 peer reviewed articles and book chapters and 85 issued or applied patents. He has had funding from NIH, NSF and DOD.

He is the scientific founder of several biotechnology spinout companies, including Nephros Therapeutics, RenaMed Biologics, CytoPherx and Innovative BioTherapies. These companies have translated the discoveries in his laboratory to treat acute and chronic renal failure, systemic inflammatory distress syndrome, and multiorgan failure. His group has been instrumental in developing cell-based and bioengineered devices for therapeutic applications in organ replacement therapy. These approaches have progressed into FDA approved IND and IDE Phase I/II. Phase II, and pivotal clinical trials.

Dr. Humes is the recipient of a number of awards, including Established Investigator at the American Heart Association, President’s Award from the National Kidney Foundation, A.N. Richards Distinguished Achievement Award in Nephrology, VA National Performance Award, Special Recognition Award from the Association of Professors of Medicine, and Laureate Award, American College of Physicians. He has been elected to honorific medical scientific societies, including the American Society of Clinical Investigation and Association of American Physicians.

Scott L. Hummel, MD, MS


Scott L. Hummel, MD, MS


scott l. hummel, md, ms

Assistant Professor, Medicine/Cardiovascular Medicine
Director, Heart Failure Program, Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Health System

734-998-7991
scothumm@umich.edu

Dr. Hummel is a board-certified Advanced Heart Failure/Transplant cardiologist at the University of Michigan and is the heart failure Program Director at the Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Health System. His K23-award funded research aims to clarify the underlying pathophysiology of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), a highly morbid condition affecting millions of Americans that is currently without evidence-based therapy. Multiple ‘salt-sensitive’ HFPEF animal models develop oxidative stress and perivascular inflammation under high-sodium intake conditions that lead to cardiorenal and vascular fibrosis and dysfunction. Dr. Hummel’s recent work suggests that the sodium-restricted Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH/SRD) diet reduces oxidative stress and vascular dysfunction in human HFPEF. Obesity and metabolic syndrome are key risk factors for the development of HFPEF, and Dr. Hummel’s future work will seek to clarify links between dietary patterns, inflammation/oxidative stress, and cardiovascular damage in these HFPEF ‘precursor’ populations. 

Robert C. Hyzy, MD


Robert C. Hyzy, MD


robert c. hyzy, md

Professor, Internal Medicine
Director, Critical Care Medicine Unit

734-936-5201
rhyzy@umich.edu

Dr. Robert C. Hyzy is an Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.  Dr. Hyzy is a graduate of Kenyon College and received his medical degree from New York University School of Medicine in New York City.  Dr. Hyzy completed his residency in Internal Medicine and fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Michigan.  He is Director of the Critical Care Medicine Unit at the University of Michigan Hospital and Co-Chair of the University of Michigan Hospital Critical Care Committee.  Dr. Hyzy’s research interests are in the area of critical care medicine, including ARDS, ventilator associated pneumonia, and quality improvement.  He was the principal investigator of an NIH funded trial examining the efficacy of GM-CSF in patients with Acute Lung Injury.  Presently, he is the site Principal Investigator of NIH sponsored trials in the treatment of ARDS and in the treatment of delirium in the intensive care unit.  Dr. Hyzy has been active in the Michigan Health and Hospital Association Keystone ICU project since its’ inception in 2003 and presently chairs the Steering Committee of the Keystone ICU Project. He served on the Technical Expert Panel for the national On the CUSP program to reduce central-line associated bloodstream infections.  He is a member of the American College of Chest Physicians Guidelines Oversight Committee and the American Thoracic Society Quality Improvement Committee. Dr. Hyzy has spoken nationally and internationally on several topics related to Critical Care Medicine. He has published multiple articles and chapters in medical journals and textbooks and has been a reviewer for the Annals of Internal Medicine, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Chest and Critical Care Medicine.  In addition, Dr. Hyzy contributes eleven topics on mechanical ventilation to the web based medical resource "UpToDate."

Theodore J. Iwashyna, MD, PhD


Theodore J. Iwashyna, MD, PhD


theodore j. iwashyna, md, phd

Associate Professor, Internal Medicine, Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine
Faculty Associate, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research
Research Scientist, Center for Clinical Management Research, Ann Arbor VA HSR&D Center of Excellence
Co-Director, National Clinician Scholars Program

734-936-5047

tiwashyn@umich.edu

Theodore "Jack" Iwashyna, MD, PhD is an Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Michigan, where his clinical practice is as a medical intensivist. He is also part of the Survey Research Center at the Institute for Social Research and the Center for Clinical Management Research at the Ann Arbor VA HSR&D Center of Excellence.

Dr. Iwashyna’s research seeks to understand the context of critical illness, both how critical illness influences a patient’s life course, and how the organizational environment influences the effectiveness of the care that a patient receives. His clinical work in the University of Michigan’s and Veteran’s Administration Hospital medical intensive care units emphasize medical critical care, including severe sepsis, ARDS and high complexity patients. A major focus of Iwashyna’s current work is to define the experience of survivorship after critical illness, particularly severe sepsis. Evidence increasingly suggests that severe sepsis is not only life-threatening, but also life-altering. How does severe sepsis reshape the lives of patients? What can be done to lessen the adverse consequences among those who survive? In collaboration with the Health and Retirement Study and others, he is working to measure long-term functional, cognitive and health care outcomes after severe sepsis. Further, he is establishing the mechanisms by which these long-term changes occur, with an eye to interventions, particularly hospital-based, that can improve the lives of survivors. At the same time, the organization of care is at the heart of critical care as specialty, rather than a focus on specific organ dysfunction. A continuing focus of Iwashyna’s work is on the organization of critical care services. Hospitals vary substantially in the quality of the critical care they provide. He is interested in two related problems. First, how can we better evaluate the quality of care that hospitals provide, using techniques that are fair and patient-centered. Second, can we integrate such information with already existing informal inter hospital transfer networks, to use existing resources more effectively. Methodologically, the group combines the traditional tools of health services research (including analysis of administrative databases and multi-level modeling) with emerging techniques in network analysis and longitudinal data analysis. It has funding from the NIH, the VA Office of HSR&D, and foundation sources.

Daniel A. Lawrence, PhD


Daniel A. Lawrence, PhD


daniel a. lawrence, phd

Frederick G L Huetwell Professor of Basic Research in Cardiovascular Medicine
Professor, Cardiovascular Medicine
Professor, Molecular and Integrative Physiology

734-936-9549

dlawrenc@umich.edu

Dr. Lawrence received his Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from Umeå University, Umeå Sweden in 1989 and completed his postdoctoral training at the University of Michigan from 1989 until 1992. He was then appointed Research Investigator in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan in 1992. In 1995, Dr. Lawrence moved to the American Red Cross Holland Laboratory for Biomedical Sciences where he was appointed Scientist I (Assistant Professor) in the Department of Biochemistry, and served a concurrent appointment as Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at George Washington University in Washington DC. He joined the University of Maryland School of Medicine in 2004 as Professor in the Department of Surgery and in 2005 returned to the University of Michigan as Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine.

Dr. Lawrence’s laboratory studies the role of proteases and their inhibitors in health and disease. Primary areas of interest focus on the vascular biology of the central nervous system (CNS) and disorders such as stroke, as well as the development of peripheral vascular disease.

He has over 25 years of experience in vascular biology and over 15 years of experience with animal models of stroke, and other CNS disorders. Studies range from very basic questions such as how binary protein interactions regulate physiologic processes to complex animal models of disease. The principal targets of this work are members of the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) family of proteins, their target proteases, including tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and the downstream protease substrates. He uses combinations of biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches to study how specific molecular interactions regulate function, and then applies this information to in vivo models of disease to test the importance of these interactions in complex physiologic processes.

One area of interest examines the basic structure function relationships of the serpin mechanism using PAI-1 and neuroserpin as model serpins. Another analyzes PAI-1's role in the development of vascular disease in both in vitro cell culture systems and in vivo. A third and major area of study examines the functions of neuroserpin and its target protease tPA, and the tPA substrate platelet derived growth factor C (PDGFc) in the CNS. These studies involve animal models of stroke and seizures and study the roles of these proteins in the regulation of the blood brain barrier. The regulation of neuronal communication processes by neuroserpin and tPA are also studied using in vitro cell cultures of primary neurons, ex vivo electrophysiological studies, and in vivo in mice. 

Brahmajee K. Nallamothu, MD, MPH


Brahmajee K. Nallamothu, MD, MPH


brahmajee k. nallamothu, md, mph

Professor, Internal Medicine, Medical School
Investigator, Center for Healthcare Outcomes and Policy
Investigator, Center for Clinical Management Research
Ann Arbor VA Medical Center

734-615-3878

bnallamo@umich.edu

Dr. Nallamothu is Professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Diseases and the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan. He received his MD from Wayne State University in 1995 and completed his residency in Internal Medicine and fellowship in General and Interventional Cardiology at the University of Michigan. He also completed research training through an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) fellowship at the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

Dr. Nallamothu’s research interests focus on improving the use and performance of coronary angioplasty and stenting in acute myocardial infarction and the care of patients with cardiac arrests. Both of these are areas that have direct implications for critical care medicine and the goals of MCIRCC. His work has led to long-term collaborative efforts with investigators in various Divisions within the Department of Internal Medicine and other Departments and Schools across campus. Most recently his team has become interested in examining new analytic tools and methods for measuring quality and costs of cardiovascular services.

His papers have appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Annals of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal, Circulation, EHJ, and JACC. He has received funding in the past from AHRQ, NIH, VA HSR&D and the BCBS Foundation of Michigan. He has participated on NIH and VA study sections targeting health services research. He is Editor-in-Chief of Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality & Outcomes, a leading cardiovascular outcomes research journal published by the American Heart Association.

Hallie C. Prescott, MD, MSc


Hallie C. Prescott, MD, MSc


hallie c. prescott, md, msc

Assistant Professor, Internal Medicine

734-936-5047

hprescot@med.umich.edu

Dr. Hallie Prescott is a member of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. She graduated from Middlebury College with a B.A. in Molecular Biology. She completed medical school and Internal Medicine residency training at The Ohio State University, where she also served as chief medical resident. In 2011, she was recruited to University of Michigan for Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine fellowship. In 2014, Hallie completed her fellowship training and graduated with a Master’s of Science in Health & Healthcare Research.

Hallie conducts health services research to understand and improve the long-term outcomes of acute medical illnesses. Her initial focus is reducing the need for repeated hospitalization after severe sepsis. She has found that the rate of hospitalization following severe sepsis exceeds patients’ baseline rate of hospitalization as well as that of carefully matched controls. Furthermore, in more recent work published in JAMA, Hallie has found that 42% of hospitalizations in the 90 days after sepsis occur for potentially preventable conditions—recurrent sepsis, less severe infection, heart failure, etc.

In addition to her research in Medicare beneficiaries, Hallie has also partnered with investigators at Kaiser Permanente to examine hospital readmissions and healthcare utilization of sepsis survivors within Kaiser’s integrated healthcare delivery system. After accounting for the differences in age between the Medicare and Kaiser cohorts, the findings were remarkably similar between these cohorts. The consistent findings across studies demonstrates the pervasiveness of re-hospitalization and new morbidity after sepsis.

While much of the current research on re-hospitalization focuses whether or not readmission penalties are “fair” to hospitals, Hallie’s work focuses on how to improve outcomes for patients. 

Hallie’s work draws on the tools of health services research, “big data” analytics, and implementation science. Her K08 will build the foundation for future translational research to uncover the biologic mechanisms of long-term morbidity post-sepsis and for future clinical interventions to improve the recovery and reduce healthcare utilization of severe sepsis survivors.

Mohammed Saeed, MD, PhD


Mohammed Saeed, MD, PhD


mohammed saeed, md, phd

Internal Medicine, Cardiology
Member of the Physician-Scientist Training Program

 msaeed@med.umich.edu

Mohammed Saeed received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 2007, and M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 2008. He also worked at Philips Healthcare (formerly Hewlett Packard) in Andover, MA from 1997-2008 as a research scientist in the area of patient monitoring and clinical decision-support. He developed algorithms using signal processing and pattern recognition for arrhythmia and hemodynamic instability prediction. He is an inventor or co-inventor on seven patents. He worked with a team of engineers and physicians from MIT, Harvard teaching hospitals, and Philips healthcare to develop a massive open-access ICU database (MIMIC-II). In 2006, his research was recognized with the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) “Most Distinguished Paper Award.”

Mohammed is a now a member of the physician-scientist training program at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He completed his internal medicine residency at the University of Michigan in 2010, and will complete his fellowship in cardiovascular medicine in 2014. He is board-certified in internal medicine.

He conducts research at the Center for Arrhythmia Research (CAR) and Michigan Center for Translational Pathology (MCTP) in the area of proteomic and systems biology analysis of atrial remodeling in animal models of atrial fibrillation. He also has research interests in applying informatics and machine-learning towards the development of next-generation monitoring and clinical-decision support systems.

Benjamin H. Singer, MD, PhD


Benjamin H. Singer, MD, PhD


benjamin h. singer, md, phd

Assistant Professor, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Internal Medicine

734-945-3874
singerb@med.umich.edu

Dr. Benjamin Singer is an Assistant Professor in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan. He received his undergraduate degree in mathematics at the University of Michigan in 2002. Dr. Singer completed his medical training and PhD in Neuroscience through the Medical Scientist Training Program, and subsequently completed residency in Internal Medicine and fellowship training in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, all at the University of Michigan.

    
Approximately half of patients who survive an episode of critical illness experience long term brain dysfunction, in the form of anxiety, depression, post traumatic stress, or cognitive impairment. Dr. Singer’s research focuses on basic and translational studies of long-term brain injury after critical illness, with a focus on sepsis. These studies utilize animal models of sepsis and patient autopsy specimens to examine the immune and vascular responses to sepsis in the brain that persist for weeks to months after the outward signs of illness have resolved. In collaboration with Dr. Bob Dickson, he also examines the role of the gut microbiome in initiation of brain injury and multiorgan failure during sepsis. The goal of this work is to identify strategies to minimize and rehabilitate ongoing brain injury in sepsis survivors. Areas of special clinical focus include the care of patients with advance neuromuscular disease requiring chronic assisted ventilation. Dr. Singer is supported by a National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Career Development Award, MICHR, and University of Michigan Depression Center.

 

Michael W. Sjoding, MD


Michael W. Sjoding, MD


michael w. sjoding, md

Fellow, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Internal Medicine

734-763-1796
msjoding@umich.edu

Dr. Sjoding is a member of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care at the University of Michigan. He received a degree in Biochemistry from Valparaiso University in Indiana, and a medical degree from Loyola Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago. He completed his internal medicine residency at the University of Chicago.

Dr. Sjoding’s primary research is in how best to measure the quality of hospital care, with a focus on intended and unintended consequences of current quality measurement programs. He is also interested in the use of high dimensional data to enhance our ability to measure and improve the care of patients with critical illness. Methodologically, this work employs the use of both clinical and large-scale administrative databases, multi-level statistical modeling, causal analysis, and simulation. His work is supported by the NIH/NHLBI T32 multidisciplinary training program in lung disease.

 

Theodore J. Standiford, MD


Theodore J. Standiford, MD


theodore j. standiford, md

Professor, Medicine
Chief, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

734-764-4554
tstandif@umich.edu

Dr. Standiford is a Professor of Medicine and Interim Chief of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Michigan. He received his MD degree from Wayne State University in 1984, completed a residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Minnesota in 1987, and a fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Michigan in 1991.  Since joining the faculty in 1991, Dr. Standiford has secured continuous  National Institutes of Health K- or R-series funding. He served as the Program Director of the University of Michigan Specialized Center of Research (SCOR) in Acute Lung Injury and the University of Michigan Specialized Center of Clinically Oriented Research (SCCOR) in Acute Lung Injury.  Dr. Standiford currently serves as the Program Director of the NIH/NHLBI T32 Multidisciplinary Training Program in Lung Diseases. 

Dr. Standiford’s research focuses on exploring the role of specific cells, cytokines, antimicrobial peptides and pathogen recognition receptors in the generation of protective innate immune responses of the lung. The epigenetic regulation of innate immunity in sepsis and acute lung injury is an active area of both animal and human based translational research. In human trials, Dr. Standiford has investigated mechanisms of lung injury in ARDS and the effect of growth factor administration on outcome in ARDS patients and in patients at risk for the development of ARDS. Specialized areas of clinical interest include sepsis, acute lung injury, community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia, and tuberculosis. 

Dr. Standiford has served as a permanent member of the NIH Lung Biology and Pathology (LBPA) and the Lung Cell and Molecular Immunology (LCMI) Study Sections. He served as a member of the American Lung Association Research Fellowship and Career Investigator Award Committee from 2000-2004, and Chair of this committee from 2004-2009.  He is an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI) and the Association of American Physicians (AAP). Dr. Standiford currently serves as an external consultant for several NIH T32 training programs and an NIH K24 patient-oriented research-training program.  He has been the primary mentor for many pre- and post-doctoral research fellows, a number of which have gone on to obtain K-series and R-series awards. Dr. Standiford’s bibliography lists over 200 peer-reviewed publications, numerous topic reviews, and book chapters. 

 

Balazs Szamosfalvi, MD


Balazs Szamosfalvi, MD


Balazs Szamosfalvi,  MD

Associate Professor,  Internal Medicine

734-936-6489

bszamos@med.umich.edu

Dr. SzamosfaIvi received his medical degree from Semmelweis University Medical School in Budapest, Hungary in 1993. He completed his  residency and 3-year combined research/clinical nephrology fellowship training  at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan.  He had previously worked for Fresenius in Hungary in 2002-2003 as a staff nephrologist.  Dr. SzamosfaIvi returned to the US in 2003 and worked at Henry Ford Hospital from 2004 until 2017 as a staff nephrologist.  From 2006 through 2017 Dr. SzamosfaIvi was the medical director of the hospital dialysis unit and CRRT program and supervised the development of a large CRRT program based on near-automated regional citrate anticoagulation principles.

Thomas S. Valley, MD, MSc


Thomas S. Valley, MD, MSc


thomas s. valley, md

Clinical Lecturer, Internal Medicine
Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

734-764-4738
valleyt@umich.edu

Dr. Valley is a Clinical Lecturer in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine in the Department of Medicine at the University of Michigan. He received his undergraduate degrees in history and chemistry from Emory University, and his medical degree from the University of Miami. He completed his internal medicine residency at the University of Texas-Southwestern/Parkland Memorial Hospital, where he also served as Chief Medical Resident. He completed a fellowship in pulmonary and critical care medicine at the University of Michigan. During his fellowship, he earned a Masters of Health and Healthcare Research from the University of Michigan.

Dr. Valley's research aims to identify the patients most likely to benefit from ICU admission. By leveraging statistical methodology with interview and survey techniques, he hopes to make sure the ICU is available for those who most need it. Dr. Valley is also interested in improving the quality of communication between providers and families in the ICU by understanding the family experience in the ICU. His work is supported by the NIH/NHLBI T32 Multidisciplinary Training Program in Lung Diseases.

Lenar Tatios Yessayan, MD


Lenar Tatios Yessayan, MD


lenar tatios yessayan, md

Associate Professor, Nephrology

734-936-6489
lenar@umich.edu

Dr. Yessayan received his bachelor of science in biology and his medical degree from the American University of Beirut in Lebanon. He received his Master of Science in Clinical Research Design and Data Analysis from the University of Michigan in 2013. Dr. Yessayan completed his Internal Medicine Residency and Nephrology and Critical Care Fellowships at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Michigan, USA. He has been practicing Nephrology and Critical Care Medicine since 2009. He is board certified in Internal Medicine, Nephrology, and Critical Care Medicine. His research interests lie in the fields of acute kidney injury, hemodynamic monitoring, medical device therapies to treat systemic inflammatory conditions and development of effluent sensing technologies for real time monitoring of solutes during extracorporeal therapies.